Archive for Blood

Poem: NOSEBLEED

Posted in Original Writing with tags , , , , , , , , , , on March 3, 2016 by smuckyproductions

 

Based on a true story, folks.

NOSEBLEED

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The first drip drops across my lips
As I stare at the sun, blinded
To the metal taste – perhaps
I can swallow it and forget; but what starts
As a pinprick becomes a stream, rivulets
Of my body flung bright as gems
On the grass, and I run
Corking the flood
With a weak finger until –

Over the sink I release it
A shower of red spatters on ivory
Run howling from a rift in my skin
And I watch in awe
As it tumbles and shatters
Almost forget to plug the hole,
Soiling virgin tissue, soon overwhelmed
By the force of this rebellion –

Who knew it was so eager?
The tissues pile, war dressings dead
But the march does not slow
Splick splick in the basin, filling
Profane shapes as I drain
And imagine the fate –

What happens if it doesn’t stop
No congealing or swelling
But only mutiny – these beasts
I’m not meant to see, escaping
Jump ship!
And my vision blurs, breath hazards
In the face of the scourge –
Perhaps on me there will be no mercy

Bandages swarm, sink a paean
To gore and still growing
I wonder what my parents will think
Coming home to a dry-husk son
Clinging to the drain, betrayed
By his own blood

Trembling and powerless
To undo this carnage, alone
In the bathroom where I will die
Unable to utter a last word, and no one
To hear it regardless
Just a shell of a boy who cries
What makes me so horrible
That my own blood needs
To escape me –

But the clot comes out
From my head’s recess, ripe as a fresh
Umbilical cord unwinding
From mother’s cavity – following
The burst of old blood grown tired
The patters in the sink
Slow

And halt.

Wash out the basin,
A killer’s final act, erase
The evidence of my body’s traitors
And laugh at how easily
The blood wipes off.

New MINUTE MORBIDITIES: DOG FOOD

Posted in Updates with tags , , , , , , , , , , on February 12, 2016 by smuckyproductions

Happy Frightening Friday, freaks! You might be hungry for some grotesque delights to kick off the weekend.

Lucky you – here’s a treat called DOG FOOD:

For the good of dogs everywhere, SHARE THE SCARE!

And SUBSCRIBE for a new morbidity, every Friday.

New MINUTE MORBIDITIES: REFRESHMENT

Posted in Updates with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on December 11, 2015 by smuckyproductions

Happy Freakish Friday, everyone! To quench that weekend thirst, here is a new MINUTE MORBIDITIES.

Drink up, and SHARE THE SCARE!

New episodes every TUESDAY and FRIDAY.

Films That Haunt Me: RAVENOUS

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 30, 2015 by smuckyproductions

As December approaches and the air grows cold, it’s time to start talking about those chilly horror classics best consumed in front of a fire while the wind howls outside. What better time to talk about the Wendigo? This elusive and freakish beast is little scene in film, which is unfortunate – it appears to great effect in one of the more unique horror offerings of the last 20 years, Antonia Bird’s RAVENOUS.

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Like an unfortunate number of 90s films, this one got misrepresented by its marketing team. While trailers make it look like an action-packed gore-fest, Bird has actually created a bizarre but terrific mix of pitch-black comedy and ruthless horror. The film follows a U.S. soldier who, disgraced during the Spanish-American war, is sent to a remote California post where nothing happens… until an unknown man stumbles in from the wilderness, half-frozen to death and terrified. He claims that his traveling group got lost in the mountains and had to resort to cannibalism – an act that possesses the eater with an ancient vampiric evil. When the soldiers go to search for the man’s crew, they realize the story is truer than they expected… and far more hideous.

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There is a veritable melting pot of genres in “Ravenous.” It’s a war epic, a vampire movie, a bloody slapstick routine, and a grand horror story straight out of Blackwood. This may have been what drove many critics and audience members away – but for those who are open to the originality, Bird mixes the genres amazingly well. It’s one of the most original films to come out of that era of horror – and possibly one of the bloodiest. When it isn’t busy being a riotous satire, it actually gets pretty frightening – there were more than a few scenes that unsettled me to my core.

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It’s fascinating, too, for its brilliant evocation of American legend. The images of the army fort and its ragtag team of soldiers are straight out of “Dances with Wolves,” but far more interesting, as Bird soaks them in gallons of guts. The Wendigo myth – something pilfered from Native American culture as a symbol of starvation and desperation – is used to comment on the nature of the American Dream: devour before they devour you.

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Sure, this theme is drawn a bit too boldly in the film – they say various versions of the above about twenty times – but it pairs the overt message so powerfully with brutal images of man eating man. The film is so ironically masculine, loud and proud about its violence, that it ends up tearing down those ideas in the same way that characters rip each other apart. Whatever patriotism the film might have had is mauled, slaughtered without mercy. It may be one of the more honest depictions of the pioneer myth. These soldiers are animalistic, and they kill like animals.

If this all sounds too crazy, then this film isn’t for you. But its gory humor and horrific statements about Americana are worth exploring. Especially as the winter sets in and the snow seems to call out, scratching hungrily at the window, begging to be fed.

New episode of MINUTE MORBIDITIES: GROOMING

Posted in Updates with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 23, 2015 by smuckyproductions

Good morning, horror fans! A gruesome Friday treat for you: the third episode of Minute Morbidities has been released. (And it’s not for the faint of heart.)

Appearance is very important.

Don’t forget to share the scare – tell your friends and family about this nasty web series!

Evil Dead Pre-screening

Posted in Updates with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 28, 2013 by smuckyproductions

I’ll be going to a student screening of Evil Dead tonight – look out for the review tomorrow. Unbelievably excited to have this opportunity.

Excision (2012): Review

Posted in Reviews with tags , , , , , , , , , on March 26, 2013 by smuckyproductions

Director/Writer: Richard Bates Jr.
Starring: AnnaLynne McCord, Traci Lords
7/10

When I was at Sundance, this film had already generated a lot of talk. Whether people liked it or not, everyone agreed on one thing: it was gruesome as hell. It became one of my most anticipated films of 2012, and it took me forever to find it.

“Excision” is a psychological horror-comedy told from the perspective of the main character, Pauline (McCord), a teenager who is repulsive in almost every way. Stuck in a pastel house with an overbearing mother (Lords), Pauline fantasizes about becoming a famous surgeon. She becomes more delusional and disgusting with each scene, as she works toward a final goal: to cure her sister’s cystic fibrosis.

Overall, the tone is similar to “Heathers” and “Ginger Snaps,” though “Excision” tops them both in terms of violence. Pauline seems to be on a quest to do as many repugnant things as she can before the film’s running time goes up, and she does a damn good job of grossing you out. Most of the time I found myself laughing in sheer disgust. The film’s more serious moments are handled just as well, though, particularly the heart-stopping ending. It’s funny at times, but Bates forces you to acknowledge the true darkness of the events by the end.

The characters are what make the film both entrancing and hard to handle. Pauline is a little too much of a smart ass at times, but she’s fascinating to watch. Her sexually charged, gore-filled dreams are the real treat of the film – gorgeously shot, full of trippy violence that is both beautiful and hideous. Lords plays the hell out of Pauline’s mother Phyllis. The dynamic between them is all over the place – hilarious, disturbing, and heartbreaking all at once. Cameos by the great Malcolm McDowell and John Waters, among others, just add to the fun.

Technically, “Excision” is done well. The color palette is vibrant, echoing 50’s motifs, which is a perfect dichotomy to the imagery. The dream sequences, as I said, are very impressive. Bates executed (no pun intended) a strong vision for the film, and the style is very confident, especially for a directorial debut.

It has its flaws, of course – Pauline is at times unrealistically nasty – but the film is loads of fun, and the ending is absolutely horrifying, guaranteed to haunt you for a while. As a horror film it works terrifically, and even transcends its genre a few times. Definitely recommended, if you’re in the mood to be grossed out, and maybe moved a little along the way too.